100,000-Years1_Feature

What Will Humans Look Like in 100,000 Years?

Jun 7 • Entertainment, Lifestyle, Technology • 82854 Views • 195 Comments

I collaborated with Dr. Alan Kwan, who has a PhD in Computational Genomics from Washington University, to hypothesize what we may look like in the future. The following is written by him…

While the future remains unknowable (for now), Nickolay Lamm produced one set of possible changes to the human face in one possible timeline where, 100,000 years in the future, through zygotic genome engineering technology, our future selves control human biology and human evolution the way we control electrons today. In this future, humankind has wrested control of the human form from natural evolution and are able to bend human biology to human needs. This future scenario and these figures are envisioned by Dr. Alan Kwan, PhD Computational Genomics from Washington University.

Today

What we look like today.

20,000-Years

 

As our understanding of the universe increases, I predict that the human head will trend larger to accommodate a larger brain. But instead of some orthogonal evolutionary path that ends up with the 210th century human a la Futurama’s Morbo the anchor-alien, the rule of viable human biology will still apply and so the entire head will trend larger, though with a bias for a greater cranium growth than facial growth; the human 20,000 years from now would look to us like someone today except we would notice the forehead is subtly too large.

By this point, communications lenses will have replaced devices such as Google Glass.

60,000-Years

While evolution in space is only beginning to be explored today, I would hazard a guess that millennia of human space colonization of Earth-orbit and other solar system space colonies will also select for…

1. Larger eyes in response to the dimmer environment of colonies further from the Sun than Earth.

2. More pigmented skin to alleviate the damaging impact of much more harmful UV radiation outside of the Earth’s protective ozone.

3. Thicker eyelids or a more pronounced superciliary arch to alleviate the effects low or no gravity that disrupt and disorient the eyesight of today’s astronauts on the ISS.

By this point in time, communications lenses (commlens) in contacts and miniature bone-conduction devices implanted above the ear will work in tandem. Bone-conduction devices, with embedded nanochips, will communicate with some external device for communications and entertainment.

100,000-Years_feature

This human face will be heavily biased towards features that humans find fundamentally appealing: strong, regal lines, straight nose, intense eyes, and placement of facial features that adhere to the golden ratio and left/right perfect symmetry. Functional bias will be incorporated into the vanity driven constraints above. Eyes would seem unnervingly large to us and have “eye shine” from the tapetum lucidum. Sideways blink of the reintroduced plica semilunaris to further protect from cosmic ray effects would be particularly startling.

For high resolution images, full report, and/or questions about this project, please email nickolaylamm@gmail.com.

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195 Responses to What Will Humans Look Like in 100,000 Years?

  1. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Digital designer Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

    • Toni McNair says:

      for all this to work out we have to have electricity or a “power” source to get our computers etc all up and running…it seems rather presumptuous that we will have that 100,000 years from now…somewhere in everything i’ve learned in anthropology and human history i missed something important about his argument…

    • Gary Engmann says:

      What a bunch of bull crap! Evolution is a theory that has never been proven. In addition there is no way this society worldwide will last 100,000 years.

      • don luke says:

        I agree humans will probably not be here in 100,000 years. Evolution is as sure as anything else in this world.
        Humans will either curtail their propagation or human life on this planet will cease.

      • Charles Stevens says:

        I’m with you Gary!
        Just like the Theory of Gravity – Just a theory people, stop taking it so seriously! If you have enough ‘faith’ you can fly like a bird – this explains how the rapture will happen!
        The Heliocentric Theory of the Solar System that says our planets revolve around the sun -Hello! Just a theory! We all know that planets are really stationary in the same spot where they were ‘created’!
        And the Germ Theory of Disease UNPROVEN! Why? Because we all know that it is Satan, not germs, that causes disease!
        Keep the faith, Gary – at least WE know the truth!!

        • Elvira says:

          Hahahah! love the sarcasm!
          …you’re being sarcastic.. right?!

        • Stuart Allan says:

          Your assumption that the earth is still in the same place it was created is like saying you are still in the same place you were born and the environment moves to your will to get where you are going.
          Which means although I live in Australia I actually am in England because my ancestors only thought up the idea of colonising a new land.
          Stop reading fiction novels and start joining the human race it’s great we have medication for you.

          What an idiot!

        • Colin Jarraw says:

          Excellent reply. And anyone thinking this is anything but sarcastic, is really an idiot.

  2. Allen F. says:

    I think they look….Keene

  3. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  4. [...] the future, with the help of Dr. Alan Kwan, a computational geneticist from Washington University. Lamm says the drawings are based on “one possible timeline,” in which humans control biology to suit our needs [...]

  5. [...] the future, with the help of Dr. Alan Kwan, a computational geneticist from Washington University. Lamm says the drawings are based on “one possible timeline,” in which humans control biology to suit our needs [...]

  6. the Don says:

    well thats about right

  7. [...] wearable technology like Google GOOG +1.75% Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  8. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  9. rabbit says:

    So he is fascinated with trends in technology and business. Apparently he knows absolutely nothing of astronomy. He speaks of colonizing the Solar System with humans suffering the effects of low gravity and increased radiation and lower sunlight yet fails miserably to indicate which planet or moon it is humans will inhabit. Sorry to burst your fantasy bubble but none exist and none ever will. Fantasy and fiction are what they are but they are not and never will be fact and should not be presented as such to a gullible low-educated nation like the USA.

    • What an insular starting point for such a project by choosing subjects with a white skin. No thought given to the increased blending and smearing of racial lines. And NO climate change scenarios have the slightest clue about what could be expected in 20,000 years, much less in 100,000 years. It is interesting that the PhD mentioned in the article is smart enough to avoid personally agreeing to the conclusions expressed by the writer

      • vicktor says:

        Also, not much thought given to what actually causes a species to change. It is evolutionary pressure deciding who lives/dies/breeds that causes a species to change, not “knowing more about the universe”. Look at how evolutionary pressure is currently working on the human race, there is no pressure to improve the species to adapt to a changing environment. I think the movie Idiocracy may have hit as close as this idea.

        • Charles Stevens says:

          Try reading this line at the beginning of the article again and you might understand a little better.

          “…through zygotic genome engineering technology, our future selves control human biology and human evolution…”

    • Charles Stevens says:

      Seriously rabbit?
      None exist and none ever will?
      And you base this upon… what exactly?
      So with the trillions upon trillions of planets in our universe (each of which you have visited, obviously) none can support human life?
      Not only can they not support humans as we exist today, but they cannot even support humans who have been genetically engineered specifically to live on them?
      I agree with you that someone is uneducated, but that finger is pointing TOWARD you, not away.

  10. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  11. Stephany Lin says:

    so those ETs are human in future revisit Earth in old time.

  12. JimMoMac says:

    So when did we all turn into bug-eyed white people?

  13. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  14. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  15. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  16. Ann Burlingham says:

    Given the current population of earth, why would we end up being so white? Even “more pigmented” white people. Yeesh.

  17. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  18. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  19. [...] Photo: Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like in 100,000 years… [...]

  20. [...] via What Will Humans Look Like in 100,000 Years? – What’s Hot. [...]

  21. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  22. b says:

    Check into severely photosensitive Lupus w/ regards to potential adaptations to u.v.a. and u.v.b. radiation. The effects include pain, burning, rashes, wide-spread inflammation (some people’s eyes burn.) The effects of Lupus aren’t mitigated by melanin (in fact it’s more prevalent among black women.) Presently, those with Lupus are a minority of the population, but I wonder if the general population might have similar reactions (and need more adaptations) when uvas and uvbs increase.

  23. JJ says:

    They seem to forget the lord will reign on earth by then, and the scientists and non believers will not be here. I will look as I am now for all eternity.. Wow, Imagine that.

    • Incredulous says:

      You’re kidding, right?

    • rob says:

      LMFAO

      Oh yeah you think you will look like you do now in the afterlife? Geeze i bet you think Jesus is a white guy with blonde hair too.

      SO what age will you be when you resurrect for all eternity? If you die at 105 will you be a shriveled up old person?

      Your image of the afterlife is a dim and childish. I so hope your 11 and not an adult with concepts like that.

    • Charles Stevens says:

      Sure, he will be here any day now… just like we’ve been warned about over the last 2,000 years.

  24. [...] What will humans look like in 100,000 years? [...]

  25. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  26. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  27. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  28. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  29. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  30. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  31. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  32. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  33. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  34. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  35. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  36. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  37. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  38. Larissa de Paula says:

    Tantas coisas mais com as quais se preocupar, e eles perdem tempo aumentando os olhos das pessoas no photoshop.

    English: So many more things with which to worry, they waste time and increasing people’s eyes in photoshop.

  39. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  40. [...] Credit for this project goes to Nickolay Lamm from UK discount site MyVoucherCodes.co.uk. [...]

  41. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  42. candice says:

    yeah! everyone is white in the future! (hmph…)

  43. [...] Nickolay Lamm van MyVoucherCodes vroeg onderzoeker Alan Kwan van de universiteit van Washington hoe het uiterlijk van de mens over [...]

  44. [...] over the next 100,000 years. If you’re that interested, the artist talks about the logic on his blog, but it’s a bit of a srtetch if you ask [...]

  45. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  46. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  47. io says:

    Why, if so many agree that our planet will have higher UV than now which would increase our need for more melanin in our skin, is every idea of humans in the future always white people?

    I also disagree with the straight thin nose. If our planet continues to get warmer a straight thin nose will not be as useful when dealing with the heat exchange between outside and our lungs.

    I further disagree with the pronounced jawline. As we progress our diets will change to the point that all the teeth we use for ripping apart complex proteins wont be needed. This would rearrange the pattern of our teeth and the need for a heavy jaw & chin to support the teeth we have now.

    If this was a project for your university work, it seems incomplete.

  48. Cindy Riachi says:

    You can try to manipulate evolution all you want through bioengineering but you won’t be successful on a grand scale. Look at the data on in vitro conceptions. Their offspring are less likely to be able to reproduce. Nature wins. Always.

  49. Ben Hu says:

    This assumes that whites don’t intermarry. In 100,000 years, all races would have mixed so much that there will be just one race, the human race, and they’ll look like Tiger Woods.

  50. LolWhiteExtinction says:

    The white race will be extinct in around 100 years. To think they will be around in 1000 years is truly the best and most comical joke ever told by man HAHAHAHAHA everyone will be either brown or black by then and that will be only 100 years from now. The only way the white race has of preserving their kind is if they start exclusively white colonies on the moon. They better hurry up and get started HAHAHAHAHAHA

  51. [...] first scientific argument for the theory of evolution based on natural selection.  However, when Nickolay Lamm and Doctor Alan Kwan – the latter of whom has a PhD in Computational Genomics from Washington University – [...]

  52. rjakobson says:

    So… apparently in the future, rather than adapt to environments with things like ‘lighting’ we’ll all still be driven by natural light input?

    And, of course, since Google Glass is the rage, we’ll definitely be influenced physiologically by that right?

    The degree of shortsighted nonsense here is beyond stunning.

    First of all, if we’re out exploring in space, I suspect we’ll bring lighting. Sure, it’s dark out there, but where people will work and play, etc., will 80-90% of the time, not be in dimly lit Moorlock chambers so the likelihood of us all growing large eyes from a lack of light is pretty remote.

    What percentage of the population will be ‘out there’ is also not taken into account. There are colonies of people who have developed an extra thumb, or even tails, but they’re so remote and have so little impact on our gene pool it’s a limited impact or we’d all have vestigial limbs.

    Similarly, why exactly will our brains increase in size? As a geneticist surely this man knows that there is zero evidence to support the theory that increased intelligence has a measurable impact on increased brain size – anthropologically the reason for our increased brain size has more to do with our diet than it does to do with our knowledge.

    Lastly, the factor of technology like Google Glass is humorous and implies that such tech will be around long enough to impact us. With current increases in nanotechnology and bio-tech, implants for the eyes will be necessary for maybe one or two generations at best. By then technology will connect us directly to external sensory systems and augment our existing systems. You don’t need to use prosthesis, (google glass, goggles, contacts) etc, if you plug directly into the brain which is far more efficient and by then be less invasive. We’re already almost there with a lot of this technology so it’s unlikely that something as simplistic as Google glass will have an impact.

    The study fails to look at the hundreds of paradigm shifts in culture and actual real world use and direction.

    Basically its someones attempt to match up a concept (grey aliens) of what they want people to look like in 100,000 years by plugging in bad info into a computer and coming up with something. But it’s not what science actually would predict.

    They need to go back and rethink this, consider real progress with technology and social changes and then apply that data – - then I’d be interested to see where this is going to take us.

  53. [...] Fonte da imagem: Reprodução/MyVoucherCodes [...]

  54. [...] Le docteur Alan Kwan, qui est une grosse tête à Computational Genomics à Washington, a tenté d’imaginer à quoi les humains pourraient bien ressembler dans 1000 siècles ! On voit déjà que le scientifique est d’un caractère optimiste car pour lui ni la terre et ni l’humanité n’auront disparu… Ainsi selon lui, grâce à la maîtrise de la génétique, tout le monde aura à peu près une tête parfaite à ceci de près qu’elle aura triplé de volume pour accueillir un cerveau de compétition, une peau bronzée pour supporter les radiations solaires et d’énormes yeux pourvus de lentilles bourrées d’électroniques pour nous interfacer avec nos semblables et les machines. On pourra donc poker sur Facebook en un clin d’oeil… [...]

  55. [...] étude de l'Université de Washington montre comment nous allons évoluer dans 100 000 ans, de ça : [...]

  56. Axolo says:

    The human brain has decreased by about the size of a tennis ball over the past 30,000 years.

    http://news.discovery.com/human/psychology/shrinking-brains-intelligence-110207.htm

  57. [...] ce que montre la prédiction de l’artiste Nickolay Lamm publiée sur le site What’s Hot et reprise par Forbes. Quelle déception! Si l’on y croyait une seconde, il y aurait de quoi se [...]

  58. [...] Read the rest at Nickolay’s site: What will humans look like in 100,000 years? [...]

  59. [...] look like those creepy frogs that you won’t let your wife bring home. This is according to Nickolay Lamm and Dr. Alan Kwan, who has a PhD in Computational Genomics from Washington [...]

  60. [...] from MyVoucherCodes.co.uk quizzed Dr. Kwan, computational genomics professor from Washington University in St. Louis, about [...]

  61. [...] a Pittsburgh-based artist, has created four sci-fi-like illustrations showing one idea of what changes to the human genome may do to the human face 20,000 years, 60,000 years, and 100,000 years hence. The images are based on hypotheses put forth [...]

  62. [...] visual artist Nickolay Lamm, who blogs at UK discount site MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, worked with a computational geneticist to illustrate three ways that humans’ physical [...]

  63. [...] visual artist Nickolay Lamm, who blogs at UK discount site MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, worked with a computational geneticist to illustrate three ways that humans’ physical [...]

  64. [...] Article from myvouchercodes.co.uk, “What Will Humans Look Like In 100,000 Years?” [...]

  65. [...] visual artist Nickolay Lamm, who blogs at UK discount site MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, worked with a computational geneticist to illustrate three ways that humans’ physical [...]

  66. [...] a Pittsburgh-based artist, has created four sci-fi-like illustrations showing one idea of what changes to the human genome may do to the human face 20,000 years, 60,000 years, and 100,000 years hence. The images are based on hypotheses put forth [...]

  67. Dennis says:

    great post thanks for sharing this!

  68. GeorgeM says:

    Sorry Doc, but in the future there will not be any white/blonde people with hazel/green or blue eyes. With all due respect and no racial bias, everyone will be brown with black hair and brown eyes – these are dominant traits. The only difference in people will still be geographical – those in the cold will tend to be short and round to conserve heat, and those in warm climates will tend to be long and slender to dissipate heat – as it is now. And, if birthrates continue at the rate that they presently are, we will look like a cross between someone from China and and someone from India. We will still have a percentage of the population that will be albino. I also predict that we will be hairless, as we no longer need it to keep warm. Now, if we were to throw away all conventional means of reproduction by means other than by random means or natural selection, then you could create your “super” race in any color you want; something that was unsuccessfully tried back in the ’30s-40s. Good luck with your theory – I’ll be long dead by then.

    • koolbean says:

      @ GeorgeM
      you are absolutely right with today’s changing environment and conditions, white will no longer exist. Combined throughout the world white birth rate is at 0 and with weak gene pool which won’t allow white to produce white children outside of there own race means they are in deep trouble. The only way to prevent extinction is total isolation. A book out there called Extinction: Fade to Brown by Clarke Given gives a fictional account of the race aspect of the US after 2050. Reading the book it sort of seems like you are looking at what could realistically happen in the future.

    • Charles Stevens says:

      I agree that it is preposterous and presumptious to assume that the future of humanity will necessarily be white. However, it would also be short-sighted to assume that they won’t.
      Higher levels of melanin in the skin means a darker complexion… now. However, there is absolutely no reason to think that we will not be able to control/manipulate our skin color by genetic engineering regardless of the level of melanin.
      Within 1,000 years we could have the ability to change our skin color like a chameleon or cuttlefish, at which point “race” will be little more than an ancient concept.

  69. [...] vyzerať vo vzdialenej budúcnosti? Takúto otázku si položil umelec a výskumník Nikolaj Lamm z myvouchercodes.co.uk pri rozhovore s Alanom Kwanom, odborníkom na výpočtovú genomiku z Washingtonskej univerzity v [...]

  70. [...] visual artist Nickolay Lamm, who blogs at UK discount site MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, worked with a computational geneticist to illustrate three ways that humans’ physical [...]

  71. [...] Reference: What Will Humans Look Like in 100,000 Years? [...]

  72. [...] a Pittsburgh-based artist, has created four sci-fi-like illustrations showing one idea of what changes to the human genome may do to the human face20,000 years, 60,000 years, and 100,000 years hence. The images are based on hypotheses put forth [...]

  73. [...] a Pittsburgh-based artist, has created four sci-fi-like illustrations showing one idea of what changes to the human genome may do to the human face 20,000 years, 60,000 years, and 100,000 years hence. The images are based on hypotheses put forth [...]

  74. [...] ability, the team says in their report, could result in more facial features that humans find intrinsically attractive: strong lines, [...]

  75. [...] ability, the team says in their report, could result in more facial features that humans find intrinsically attractive: strong lines, [...]

  76. [...] ability, the team says in their report, could result in more facial features that humans find intrinsically attractive: strong lines, [...]

  77. [...] ability, the team says in their report, could result in more facial features that humans find intrinsically attractive: strong lines, [...]

  78. [...] ability, the team says in their report, could result in more facial features that humans find intrinsically attractive: strong lines, [...]

  79. [...] ability, the team says in their report, could result in more facial features that humans find intrinsically attractive: strong lines, [...]

  80. [...] Artist Nickolay Lamm collaborated with Dr. Alan Kwan, a computational geneticist, to illustrate how the human being’s physical appearance may change in the next 100,000 years. Among their predictions is a considerably increased head size, due to enlarged surface area of the brain, as well as larger eyes and pigmented skin. [...]

  81. [...] the determining factors of natural evolution and put in the service of human needs and tastes. In a report, the pair chart the biological and genetic [...]

  82. [...] the determining factors of natural evolution and put in the service of human needs and tastes. In a report, the pair chart the biological and genetic [...]

  83. [...] ability, the team says in their report, could result in more facial features that humans find intrinsically attractive: strong lines, [...]

  84. [...] the determining factors of natural evolution and put in the service of human needs and tastes. In a report, the pair chart the biological and genetic [...]

  85. koolbean says:

    Extinction takes you to the year 2053 where people of color now outnumber whites.

    The country has been headed in that direction for over 40 years. People of color occupy official positions in every capacity from the President of the United States down to the city Mayors.

    The fear in the air is palpable and there are some who believe this country is headed for a new civil war. Whites are now experiencing some of the same prejudices that had been placed on people of color for over 400 years.

    To complicate matters, a new drug has been developed referred to as “enhancement” that changes the pigmentation of the skin. Taken by whites, this drug will darken their skin color and afford them the opportunity to blend in with the changing environment and further their career opportunities. This drug is used by whites from all walks of life, from house wives to lawyers, bankers and even lawmakers.

    Richard Evans is a successful lawyer who just happens to be white and one of those who see this as an advantage and opportunity. Still others like Paul Carlson who think this will eventually erode the base of his race and lead to their extinction. He and other mysterious figures are determined to see that this never happens … by any means necessary!

    • GeorgeM says:

      @ Koolbean – I also predict that our brains will get smaller as we no longer use them to retain information – we lookup information. I think (no pun intended :-)) that our brains will continue to evolve in order to multitask more efficiently – probably capable of parallel thinking – i.e. drive while texting safely. We will lose the power of speech, being reduced to a series of grunts as evident in today’s youth culture. Our writings will be reduced to swiping on a piece of glass, hence our index fingers will probably evolve into a stylus-like tool. We will be a far cry from Spartacus physically and nowhere as innovative as Tesla, Roentgen or Edison.

    • Mike says:

      “Whites are now experiencing some of the same prejudices that had been placed on people of color for over 400 years.”

      HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

  86. WhyNotV2 says:

    I’ll go along with it except the part about the bigger cranium. My reasoning being that if we are using only a tenth (or eight) of our brain now, until we unlock the rest of it there’s no reason for an increased size. Will we be able to do that in 100,000 years? Maybe.

  87. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, [...]

  88. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, [...]

  89. TruthBeTold says:

    Where are the antennae which we no doubt will develop in order to see around us at every angle when we’re in a car, for instance?

  90. [...] dos séculos. Mas e em relação ao futuro? O designer Nikolay Lamm e o geneticista Alan Kwan produziram uma linha do tempo que mostra como poderá ser a aparência dos seres humanos nos próximos cem mil [...]

  91. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, [...]

  92. roccop777 says:

    This is a classic example of how science has, under the influence of the theory of evolution, evolved into baseless science fiction! In a statement by the National Association of Biology Teachers (U.S.) Evolution is defined as: “an unsupervised, impersonal, UNPREDICTABLE and natural process of temporal descent with genetic modification that is affected by natural selection, chance, historical contingencies and changing environments.”
    It is ludicrous to think that eyes will evolve larger to adjust to less light in space environments. What actually happens is that humans compensate with technology. Or does one seriously think that humans will sprout wings, as they get more dependent on air travel?
    Recently an empirical study in the development of human intelligence published in the journal “Intelligence” has demonstrated that IQ levels are actually de-volving. The diminishing IQ data are consistent with what the authors called “dysgenic trends”—downward-trending intelligence genes. This trend matches other recent findings of accumulating mutations in neuron genes.

    • Charles Stevens says:

      Did you even read the article?
      The point is that we will control our evolution through genetic engineering. This takes natural selection largely out of the picture.

      • roccop777 says:

        Yes I read the article — do you seriously think artificial selection will result in humans sprouting wings to facilitate their increase in air travel?
        The fact is, artificial selection messes things up faster than natural selection. A classic example are the various breeds of dogs. In the last 150 years the gentic pool of the gray wolf has been subject to an unprecedented amount of artifiial selection, which has ended up with breeds ranging from the Great Dane to chihuahas. The devastating result — the more artificial selection takes place, the less viable the breed becomes! Over 20% of Dalmatians are deaf, German Shepherds have chronic hip problems,Dachshunds have debilitating spine problems, not to mention eating disorders. The mixed/recombinated mutt is genetically superior — and the original Gray wolf has the most robust gene pool. Evolution should be re-titled De-volution, because of its inability to produce anything better, or on a higher level of complexity — and natural or artificial selection doesn’t help.

        • GeorgeM says:

          @ roccop777 – Your comparisons to dogs is a superior example of humans meddling with nature. But – I have to disagree on one point: Breeding 2 genetically deficient or dogs with congenital issues will not necessarily result in a healthier litter. You can’t make chocolate out of crap – even though they’re both brown. Only in NAND gates does 0 AND 0 = 1.

          I have a beautiful Peke-Poo (Pekinese/Poodle) dog with luxating patellas and an underbite. Obviously, the result of poor and irresponsible breeding by unscrupulous humans. I love her, though – Total human emotion, BTW.

          Mr. Stevens is so far off the charts that, I don’t even know where to start. Let’s just say that in the animal kingdom, the toughest, strongest and healthiest male always wins. The runt of the litter usually dies, and sickly or defective offsprings are eaten, if not by the parents, then by other predators – just as nature intended it. And, the pack leader is always being challenged by other males for pack/pride/group leadership. Yet, we humans are de-evolving. We no longer hunt for food – nor do we compete mano a mano to see who’s semen will carry the next generation. We humans keep dicking around, making fake limbs, medicating, masking, treating and making excuses for genetically inferior beings. And you know what? – It is perfectly human. Autism, allergies, resistant strains of bacteria and viruses, the gluten intolerant are examples of good medical intentions gone bad. PS – let your children play in the mud – that is, if there aren’t any pesticides or chemical leaching in the mud….

          Mr. Stevens, earthlings on earth is what we are talking about. Once you create something that is not made for this planet, then it is no longer an earthling nor a Homo-sapien. What good is having someone that can breath straight methane in zero gravity on this planet? Great, so you create a race of mole people….what kind of human rights will they have? Oops, forgot – They’re no longer human! Will they be equals among the rest of us? The one inspired/deranged German that tried to create a pure, super race forgot about the variables that make us human and therefore failed – not for religious reasons, but because there has to be that “x” factor – natural attraction, pheromones, lust and love. Anything else is just inhuman or inhumane. Computers, technology and convenience are the reasons we have devolved into a longer-living race of couch potatoes. Are we not men? We are DEVO. Now, where did I put that damn remote…?

        • Charles Stevens says:

          Comparing zygotic genetic engineering and artificial selection is like comparing an F-22 Raptor to the Wright Brothers’ “Flyer”.

  93. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, [...]

  94. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, [...]

  95. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were formed on a arrogance that by a 210th century, scientists [...]

  96. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, [...]

  97. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, [...]

  98. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, [...]

  99. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, [...]

  100. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, [...]

  101. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, [...]

  102. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, [...]

  103. rhe23 says:

    This whole thing is complete non-sense.
    For starters, Brain size in humans is actually getting SMALLER, not larger.

  104. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, [...]

  105. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, [...]

  106. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, [...]

  107. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, [...]

  108. nonion says:

    So the future of the human race is… anime?

  109. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, [...]

  110. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, [...]

  111. R says:

    This is total crap. Selection must take place in order for any change to place. For example, people with smaller eyes have to reproduce at a lower rate in order for the eyes to get bigger. If everyone survives to reproduce (and everyone reproduces at the same rate) then NO change takes place. Most people who dabble in this “what will humans look like in the future” have zero understanding of the theory of evolution and natural selection, and end up with nonsense conclusions (as in this article). (BTW I have Ph.D. in a biological science.)

    • Charles Stevens says:

      Ok, Mr. Ph.D. -
      Perhaps you should take a few classes in reading comprehension.

      The entire point of the article is that we (through zygotic genome engineering) will control our own evolution. We will have wrested control of our evolution away from natural selection.

      We will say, “Here is planet #123 to colonize, here is how we need to engineer the colonizers to survive and thrive in it’s specific environment.”

      “Here is planet #456 to colonize, here is how we need to engineer the colonizers to survive and thrive in it’s specific environment.”

  112. [...] the determining factors of natural evolution and put in the service of human needs and tastes. In a report, the pair chart the biological and genetic [...]

  113. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, [...]

  114. Hmmmm...... says:

    Am I a bad person for thinking that females would have to have inordinately large lady parts to accomodate that guy’s huge head during the miracle of birth?

    • GeorgeM says:

      No – you are not a bad person ;-) Females will also have to evolve in order to fit the huge craniums of the future – Let’s just hope that our members will also evolve or we’ll just end up having Panda sex….

  115. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, [...]

  116. [...] pesar de que el futuro sigue siendo desconocido para nosotros (por ahora), Nickolay Lamm piensa que el ser humano será capaz de controlar su biología y su evolución para satisfacer sus [...]

  117. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, [...]

  118. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, [...]

  119. [...] Imagery by Nickolay Lamm What Will Humans Look Like in 100,000 Years? – What's Hot [...]

  120. LEO Balboni says:

    One sentence: WE ARE BECOMING THE GREYS (ALIEN).

  121. [...] les hommes auront des yeux bien plus grands car nous verrons au-delà du soleil et de la terre. Ensuite, notre peau sera plus pigmentée, si on en croit l’hypothèse n°2 du Dr Knawn. [...]

  122. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  123. [...]   Para conocer más del creador aquí su blog. [...]

  124. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, [...]

  125. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  126. [...] a Pittsburgh-based artist, has created four sci-fi-like illustrations showing one idea of what changes to the human genome may do to the human face 20,000 years, 60,000 years, and 100,000 years hence. The images are based on hypotheses put forth [...]

  127. InuyashaSucks says:

    This is some dude’s anime wet dream.

  128. InuyashaSucks says:

    like anime much? Maybe we will procreate with tentacles in the future too?

  129. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, [...]

  130. [...] on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, [...]

  131. [...] from MyVoucherCodes.co.uk quizzed Dr. Kwan, computational genomics professor from Washington University in St. Louis, about [...]

  132. Nick says:

    Absolute rubbish!

    If evolution is true then the more about of people/animals there are the slower evolution will be.

    Given the amount of people on earth it’s going to take millions and millions of years for humans to evolve at the same pace and way.

    It would probably never happen!

  133. [...] as new, wearable technology like Google Glass change the way we use our bodies and faces? Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm has partnered with a computational geneticist to research and illustrate what we might look like [...]

  134. pedro sholl says:

    Evrybody will look like a manga

  135. lonnie carl says:

    The future is already shown in the Film Idiocracy by Mike Judge (creator of Beavis and Butthead). Its fun but reflects a deep truth of degeneracy of modern civilization… where the darwinian rules that made us are no longer active.

  136. […] conjecture, but also more than armchair futurism. Lamm based his illustrations on discussions with Dr Alan Kwan, an expert in computational genomics from Washington University who drew up a research paper to […]

  137. […] a new project poses a different possibility. Designer and researcher Nickolay Lamm teamed up with Dr Alan Kwan of the University of Washington, an expert in computational genomics, […]

  138. […] conjecture, but also more than armchair futurism. Lamm based his illustrations on discussions with Dr Alan Kwan, an expert in computational genomics from Washington University who drew up a research paper to […]

  139. Chenyang Li says:

    This kind of predictions is inevitably somewhat Eurocentric, even if such biases are not intrinsic. There is no fundamental or metaphysical aesthetic reason why “big eyes, straight nose” and other Caucasian-like features are intrinsically more attractive. These things, as with whether we find thin or fat women attractive, are all conditioned by socio-economic and cultural contexts. Therefore in the future when humans are able to manipulate their own genes freely, it is highly unlikely that the majority of the people would simply adhere to a single aesthetic standard, and even more unlikely that this single aesthetic standard will be based on a Western-centric one, as even today in the 21st century the West is already becoming less dominant and less important relative to the non-Western world.

  140. […] Researcher Nickolay Lamm and Dr Alan Kwan an expert in computational genomics from the University of Washington, joined forces to postulate what humans might look like 100,000 years in the future The results are bizarre and vaguely familiar. […]

  141. […] conjecture, but also more than armchair futurism. Lamm based his illustrations on discussions with Dr Alan Kwan, an expert in computational genomics from Washington University who drew up a research paper to […]

  142. […] de la Universidad de Washington en Estados Unidos. La información fue publicada en el blog The Code Word y como no era de esperarse, suscitó una serie de «dimes» y « diretes” de varios […]

  143. […] de la Universidad de Washington en Estados Unidos. La información fue publicada en el blog The Code Word y como no era de esperarse, suscitó una serie de «dimes» y « diretes” de varios […]

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